(#369) About Kayaks And Perspective

June 18, 2017

If we focus on the possible negative, we get sucked into it.

Lessons. Everywhere, lessons present themselves.  And they remind us that we are always students. Lifelong learners. If we pay attention.

My latest education has come over the past few weeks courtesy of my new twelve-foot ocean kayak.

Previously, I had paddled in the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean, the Florida Keys, and in North Florida inlets.  Let’s say my first week of ocean kayaking has gifted me some wonderful lessons.

  • Perspective. I spend time on the beach observing surfers and paddle boarders. I notice smooth water, small waves, and storm-tossed breakers. The appreciation for the conditions, though, changed when I walked my kayak into the ocean for the first time. The waves took on a very different perspective  atop of (and soon tossed from) my kayak seat.
    • Lesson. Until we dive into a project, we do not have a full appreciation of what to expect.  A new job might look perfect—until we report to work. Perhaps it’s criticizing a co-worker, government action, or the stance of a group different from ours.  Until we get into that water, we really don’t understand that perspective.

  • Respect and Fear. I have always had a deep respect for the ocean.  That is different from the fear I felt the first time I paddled beyond the breakers. I could feel myself tense up—which in turn led to poor body mechanics. Instead of attacking the waves, I stopped paddling–and eventually ended up in the water with the boat on top of me. (With a broken seat back and lost sunglasses, thank you very much!)
    • Lesson. Fear can lead to counter-productive actions. We start to focus on the thing we do NOT want to do. I once heard a race car driver’s advice on how NOT to hit the racetrack wall. Simply, he said, do NOT look at the wall. If we focus on the possible negative, we get sucked into it. My first day on the kayak I focused on the waves and not being tossed rather than focusing on the shore and gliding to a stop. I tensed up and face planted in the water.

  • Adrift. The first time I got beyond the breakers and to (relatively) smoother, less undulating water, I looked back and saw that I was further from shore than I had thought. The voice in my head cried, “What the hell are you doing out here? Way out here?”
    • Lesson. When we attempt something new, when we stretch ourselves, we might feel adrift. Like we have no anchor. We find ourselves treading unfamiliar waters. Some people quit. Some figure out how to persevere. Some look for reassurance and guidance.  In my case, I looked a little north and spied surfers and paddle boarders. I felt better knowing others were close by. They wouldn’t paddle my boat but just knowing others were in similar waters gave me a feeling of security. When you feel lost and adrift, look around for those who may be in similar waters. Collegiality can be a powerful motivator.
  • Coaching. I sought out a neighbor with experience to help me with kayaking technique.  From posture, to paddle stroke, to entering and leaving the surf, he has provided needed guidance. Simple ideas take root due to his repetition
    • Lesson.  There is no need to be an island.  Reach out for coaching.  A fresh set of eyes and a different perspective can help move you to a new level. (And do not forget gratitude. Bruce found a twelve-pack of his favorite beverage on his patio later that week.)
  • Daily Discipline. Each day I go out, I see improvement. I paddle further; spill less frequently; unload, load, and strap the kayak to the cart with more skill.  I now look at how the waves break on a particular day before lunging into the surf.  I am more aware. I still have a long way to paddle—and I have come a long way, as well.
    • Lesson. Whether you want to call it locus of control or self-efficacy, when you fall short, get up, fall again, get up again…ad nauseum….you learn, you grow, and move closer to a goal. If we fail to notice that we fail to notice—we hinder our movement forward.


Video recommendation for the week.

Sometimes laughing is the best way to soothe a bruised ego. With that in mind, my bride sent me this video link.  Even kayakers have a blooper reel.


Make it an inspiring week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my new book, Stories About Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.

You can subscribe to my newsletter by clicking here.

My podcasts: The Growth and Resilience Network™ (http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

My programs and webinars: website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) and (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? (3rd edition).

(c) 2017. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.


(#350) Regrets? Choices And Lessons.

February 5, 2017

A culmination of all those choices. Some small.
Some large. All help create the person you are becoming.

Would you, if you could, go back in time and change the choices that you made?  I know.  A wide open question and open to lots of interpretation. (I’m not thinking about those 1970’s leisure suits you might have bought…though I can remember that red crushed faux velvet suit I wore in 1974.  Insert hand against forehead here!)

In response to an earlier blog post, a friend shared a Mercyme music video with me last week. (I have posted it in the Video Recommendation section below.) The songwriter is writing a letter to his younger self. At one point he considers, “Even though I love this crazy life, sometimes I wish it were a smoother ride….”

Photo (c) Steve Piscitelli

Photo (c) Steve Piscitelli

While there have been some rough, tumultuous, and gut-wrenching times, I don’t think I would change my choices. Yes, some of the stuff was a real pain in the posterior. Sure, if I had the “power” to go back, I would be tempted to take back an ill-advised word, change a self-congratulatory action, or rethink an ill-conceived plan.  And while I might wish I had had more tact, diplomacy, and grace, I am willing to concede that all of those choices for good or bad made me who I am today.

I own the choices. I look at their culmination in the mirror each day.

I have had failures to be sure. As cliché as it sounds, they helped me grow.

Again, Mercyme sings it this way to the younger self:

…Or do I go deep

And try to change

The choices that you’ll make

‘Cause they’re choices

That made me….

Regrets? That’s a question each person has to answer. I do not make light of traumatic situations you may have faced or currently confront.  Consider, however, your overall life journey. The people you have touched. The differences you have made and the legacy you will leave (and build each day).  A culmination of all those choices. Some small. Some large. All help create the person you are becoming. Don’t be too quick to dismiss any of them. This does not excuse inappropriate behavior. It does look for lessons, though.

John Milton observed that “the mind is its own place, and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.”

Photo (c) Steve Piscitelli

Photo (c) Steve Piscitelli

I titled a song on my second CD, “Love My Life.”  And old man speaks to a young person and shares:

Listen to what I say

Life’s too short to throw away

It’s filled with many threats

And too many do regret the life they’ve lived

But I choose to live my life instead.


Enjoy the entire recording by clicking below. (c) Steve Piscitelli. 2010. All rights reserved.


Video recommendation for the week:

Mercyme’s Dear Younger Me.


Make it an inspiring week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my new book, Stories About Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.

You can subscribe to my newsletter by clicking here.

Check out my latest podcasts at The Growth and Resilience Network™
(http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

Check out my website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) for programming information as well as details about upcoming webinars  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff?  (3rd edition).

(c) 2017. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.


(#346) Video Outtakes: Finding Humor And Moving Forward

January 8, 2017

Enjoy three-minutes-and-fifty-one-seconds of my miscues.
And consider how each miscue you make can strengthen you and maybe help someone else. Don’t be ruled by fear of failure.

President Theodore Roosevelt had a way with words. Growing up as a spindly and sickly child, “Teddy” would become an adult exuding energy, purpose, confidence, and resilience. Whatever your view of his politics, his fortitude stands out.

Nearly three decades ago, as I was navigating a major life transition, I gravitated to one of his quotes:

“Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure… than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.”

The quote reminded me of the importance of not allowing the fear of failure to rule my decisions.

Photo (c) Steve Piscitelli

Photo (c) Steve Piscitelli

This week’s blog does not purport to be as heady or profound as our former Rough Ridding president. Nor am I discounting the disconcerting reality of life traumas.

But at times, a bit of humor can remind us to lighten up. Especially when we stumble.  Such was the case recently as I recorded forty-two videos to accompany my newly released book Stories About Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island.

My wife, bless her soul, served as the videographer.  We actually shot each video twice. Once as a “draft” to see how they looked. The second time was the final shoot.  So, in reality, we shot eighty-four videos over a four-month period.  (Did I mention how much I love my wife’s patience?)

And each video had a number of “do-overs” due to errors on my part, environment interference, or technical glitches.  I decided to gather up some of those clips and put them into one video of outtakes.  More than three minutes of my mistakes and frustration. And each time I watch it, I howl with delight.  I have to admit, there were times during the video sessions that I felt like giving up. For a variety of reasons, I’m glad I didn’t.

Again, Teddy Roosevelt said, “It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.”

Or as Anthony Burgess is reported to have said, “Laugh and world laughs with you, snore and you sleep alone.”

So, enjoy three-minutes-and-fifty-one-seconds of my miscues. And consider how each miscue you make and encounter can strengthen you and maybe help someone else.


Video recommendation for the week:

So, you think it’s easy to make videos?


Make it an inspiring week, a wonderful holiday season, and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about my new book, Stories About Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.

You can subscribe to my newsletter by clicking here.

Check out my latest podcasts at The Growth and Resilience Network™
(http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

Check out my website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) for programming information as well as details about upcoming webinars  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff?  (3rd edition).

(c) 2017. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.


(#276) Mistakes, Disappointments, Curiosity and Growth

September 6, 2015

When we choose not to dare because we might “risk feeling disappointed”
we end up “choosing to live disappointed.”

Nearly thirty years ago I made a huge professional mistake.  At that time I decided to make a career move from classroom teaching to an administrative slot at a university. Within three days in the new position I knew without a doubt that I had made a colossal mistake. Within three months I resigned the position.

To some observers, it looked like a mind-numbing, stupid and personal failure.  I still remember an encounter when I returned to the classroom the following year. A “colleague” announced in the teacher’s lounge that Piscitelli just couldn’t hack it out there.

Hmm.

That would have been true if I had allowed that disappointment to become an excuse to never risk again.  If I had followed that path, that would have been a failure.

About five years later I made, what appeared to be, another professional misdirection. And again, what seemed a mistake/failure/bone-headed move proved to be anything but. Lost in the forest of doubt and regret.

Image by moggara12 @ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image by moggara12 @ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Another “colossal mistake”—that ended up being one of the biggest, best, and brightest decisions I ever made.

Each of these “failures” made it possible for me to stretch and become someone better than I had been.  Without each of the two decisions (above) I doubt I would have had the opportunities to become an author, speaker, facilitator, and college professor. Each “misstep” led to a series of valuable lessons and opportunities in my life.

Not too shabby for someone who supposedly couldn’t “hack it.”

Don’t let fear of failure stop you. Don’t let the naysayers tell you what you can and cannot do.

Brené Brown, in her new book Rising Strong, reminds us that when we choose not to dare because we might “risk feeling disappointed” we end up “choosing to live disappointed.” How many people do you know who choose to “settle”? Is that the life you want?

2014-07-17 13.23.46

In the workplace, transformational leaders understand this as well. They give their people room to breathe and, yes, make mistakes—and grow. I had a coffee conversation this week with a person who appears to be a wonderfully gifted (upper) manager in her field. Unfortunately for her and her organization, she has been stymied by gate-keeper after gate-keeper.  Her transactional leader doesn’t appear to provide much in the way of trust or growth opportunities. This employee suffers, the organization suffers, and the people it serves will suffer. No doubt in my mind.

Seth Godin refers this as “Don’t touch it, you might break it.”  The great leaders encourage touching! And if it breaks, we will fix it together.


Video recommendation for the week:

Make no mistake (pun intended), each of my decisions (above) and their immediate consequences felt like the end of the world. Prime time for beating myself up.  And while I did more of that than anyone else did to me, I had to move through the disappointment. As Al Seibert said in The Resiliency Advantage, we can cope or we can crumble.”


Consider Dan Nevins.  He faced unbelievable hardships and odds. “Disappointment” really is much too mild of a descriptor for his journey. And most definitely, he is not a failure. What an inspiration!  Check out his story.

And so can you be an inspiration as you move forward.

In her book Fail, Fail Again, Fail Better, Pema Chiron reminds us that when things just don’t work for us, we “could get curious about what is going on.”  Mistakes, James Joyce said, are “the portals of discovery.

What dream or circumstance do you have that fills you with a bit (or a lot) of trepidation?  What causes the reticence? What little (or big) step can you do this week that will put you in the mindset of “What if I did this?” YES, you might fail and be disappointed. AND think of the exhilaration awaiting you with the chance and the potential for change. Either way, you learn and grow.

Put the energy vampires aside. Don’t let “perfection” and “disappointment” rule.  You have so much more to offer yourself and those around you.

Make it a wonderful week—H.T.R.B. as needed.

You can find my podcast series at Growth and Resilience(http://stevepiscitelli.com/video-media/podcasts). 

Check out my website  (http://www.stevepiscitelli.com/programs.html) for programming information as well as details about upcoming webinars (http://www.stevepiscitelli.com/webinars).

My books Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff?  (3rd edition) are published by Pearson Education.

(c) 2015. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

 


(#250) Motivating the Motivators

March 8, 2015

Beyond the paycheck and benefits, what is being done
to motivate those who are charged with motivating our students?

Last week, I had the following question posed to me: How can we motivate more faculty to take control of their professional development? 

Intriguing.

In higher education we devote a lot of resources (time, money, facilities, and people) to the topic of student motivation.  But what do we do (institutionally, administratively and collegially) to motivate faculty?  Beyond the paycheck and benefits and the one-and-done workshops, what actions motivate those who are charged with motivating our students?

Image: Markuso/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image: Markuso/
FreeDigitalPhotos.net

True, for many of us, our students remain our motivation. But beyond the students what motivates us to seek out new strategies and topics? What motivates us to stay fresh? Are we in a survival mode or renewal mode?

In the last few months I have heard colleagues (nationwide) speak of burnout. Some are long-in-the-tooth veterans and some are relatively new to our calling.  One new faculty member said she wanted to take steps early in her career to address burnout before it tripped her up.

Perhaps you have heard of compassion fatigue.  There are physical, emotional, spiritual, and professional steps we all can take to practice self-care.

What do faculty (and their leaders) do to foster/fuel their physical, mental, emotional and spiritual energy needs? Tony Schwartz of The Energy Project states, “Any organization that fails to build a robust learning program for its employees–not just to increase their skills but also to develop them as human beings–ought to expect that its people won’t get better at their jobs over time and may well get worse.”

Video recommendation for the week:

How do you renew yourself for sustainable performance?

For this week’s blog let’s briefly examine professional development from a different perspective—how to motivate faculty to take control of their development.  In fact, I would argue we ditch the term “professional development” and replace it with “professional growth and resilience.” The first is very “other-directed” (an “expert” tells you what you need); the second can be more “you-directed.”

My initial brainstorming has led me to the following (somewhat random list) on the topic. Actually, at this point, I am asking more questions than I am answering.

Image: dan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image: dan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Will the following help motivate faculty to seek/follow/continue with professional development? In short, how can we:

  • As much as possible, let faculty have control/choice over their faculty development and let them identify their needs and passions and then move from there?
  • Connect PD/FD activities with individual career/personal trajectories? Not everyone in higher education is interested climbing the rungs of administrative promotions/advancement. How can we help faculty explore the various spokes of professional growth? (Consider service, authorship, speaking, training, mentoring, design and development to name a few of the diverse areas that support growth and resilience.)
  • Connect institutionally-driven professional development days to what faculty find of professional interest?
  • Enable leadership to create a culture of active communication (listening; give-in-take)?
  • Infuse reflective practice so that faculty can see connections between professional growth and personal resilience? (We can talk a lot about balance and well-being, but what does the campus culture actually do to promote and support true opportunities for on-going renewal and recovery?)
  • Allow/promote faculty to share their personal passions with their colleagues? (Maybe with a 20 x 20 PechaKucha format; maybe a teacher’s showcase; and/or another format.)
  • Encourage stretching and opportunities for failure and learning (ala FailCon)?
  • Find ways to incorporate laughter?
  • Facilitate and support conference and/or professional meeting attendance?
  • Find meaningful incentives (beyond intrinsic) to encourage faculty?

Growth and resilience require that we have awareness about what we are doing, why we are doing it, and how we can make movement to improvement.

I would love to hear your thoughts and experiences.

Make it a great week. And H.T.R.B. as needed.

Thank you for taking the time to read my blog post. Please share it (and any of the archived posts on this site) with friends and colleagues. You also can follow me on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. If you get a chance, visit my Facebook page and join in–or start–a conversation (www.facebook.com/stevepiscitelli).  If you have suggestions for future posts, leave a comment.

Check out my website (http://www.stevepiscitelli.com/programs.html) for programming information as well as details about upcoming webinars  (http://www.stevepiscitelli.com/webinars).

Information on my book, Choices for College Success (3rd ed.), can be found at Pearson Education.

(c) 2015. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.


(#243) Failure Is An Option

January 18, 2015

How will I stretch myself in the coming week? Even if I might fail,
what will I do to continue my learning and growth?

WHAT IF?  Consider the power and challenge of that question.  Make it personal and it becomes more powerful and more challenging: “WHAT IF I …..?

Great things can happen when we take risks.  The same-ol’-same-ol’ happens when we play it safe. And we can argue that “playing it safe” is anything but. In a fast-paced and ever-changing world, if we play it safe, we might as well pull into the rest area and watch the others speed by on their journeys. We can be content in our safe place out of the potential pitfalls of the road.

Is that what you want?

Image: Stuart Miles @ www.FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image: Stuart Miles @ http://www.FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Last week I helped facilitate a night of professional development for FSCJ’s adjunct faculty. Called the Edison Effect, the evening focused on the power of stretching our limits even when failure is a real possibility.  We had lively conversation as well as time set aside for reflection.  The bottom line:  We encouraged those in attendance to step outside their comfort zones and commit to do one thing new/different/risky this term.

Rather than risk-aversion we encouraged risk-taking.  Not foolish risks; nor risks that would hurt another being. Risks that would move them to challenge old assumptions and redundant actions.

Of course, this not only takes chutzpa on the part of the risk-taker it also requires a leadership team that encourages such action.

The center piece at each table represented products that evolved out of  what initially were considered failures—or at the very least, unexpectedly came out of a process aimed at developing another product. An accident that led to a greater success than imagined.  Post-it notes, chocolate chip cookies, the slinky, and potato chips were some of the items.

A recent Google search found the following:

  • “Failure is not an option”—422 million hits
  • “Risks bring success”—182 million hits
  • “Failure is an option but fear is not”—4.5 million hits

Lots of talk. What are we doing about it?

Video recommendation for the week:

Let’s hear from a big loser!

FailCon, an inspiration for me, simply states that it “is a conference for start-up founders to study their own and others’ failures and prepare for success.”  Failure leads to success.

In A More Beautiful Question the author posits that those who always have the answers—the so-called “experts”—are merely people who have stopped learning.  Perhaps for these “experts” failure is no longer an option.

What if we keep learning? By stumbling along as we find our way.  Not playing it safe because we might skin a knee.

Samuel Beckett wrote “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”

Why not fail fast and fail forward. Again and again.

Your homework: Take a five-minute reflective break and write your response to the following:

How will I stretch myself in the coming week? Even if I might fail, what will I do to continue my learning and growth (professionally and/or personally)?

Indeed, WHAT IF I…?

Thank you for taking the time to read my blog post. Please share it (and any of the archived posts on this site) with friends and colleagues. You also can follow me on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. If you get a chance, visit my Facebook page and join in–or start–a conversation (www.facebook.com/stevepiscitelli).  If you have suggestions for future posts, leave a comment.

Check out my website (http://www.stevepiscitelli.com/programs.html) for programming information as well as details about upcoming webinars  (http://www.stevepiscitelli.com/webinars).

Information on my book, Choices for College Success (3rd ed.), can be found at Pearson Education.

(c) 2015. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

 


(#202) Obstacles to Goal Achievement

April 6, 2014

Stating or writing a goal is the easy part.
The work is found in making a plan, executing that plan,
and re-calibrating along the way.

Information on goal setting can be found in the business success literature, leadership manuals, student success classes and textbooks, and coaching seminars.  It has received a lot of space on this blog as well. At times we can find ourselves inundated with advice on goal setting.

This coming Friday, I will be facilitating a webinar on the topic of goals.  More poignantly, I will address the need to go beyond goal setting to goal achieving.  Stating or writing a goal is the easy part.  The work is found in making a plan, executing that plan, and re-calibrating along the way.

Image: StuartMiles/ FereeDigitalPhotos.net

Image: StuartMiles/
FereeDigitalPhotos.net

One small piece of the webinar will examine why it is difficult for so many people to move beyond the setting to the achieving stage.  Let me give you the shortlist. Perhaps you have experienced one or more of these:

  •        Too big?
    •        Simply stated, you have set your sites much too high—at least for where you are right now.  The student who says “I will raise my English grade from an ‘F’ to an ‘A’ in one week” is delusional. So is the person who has never had a regular workout regimen and now vows to work out 2 hours per day for 5 days every week. Please don’t misread this.  Setting big goals—goals that force us to stretch separate the good from the great (as Jim Collins has said). This might be the place to break those huge goals into smaller and more manageable short-term goals. Start small…and stay steady!
  •        Too quick?
    •        Connected to the item above:  You may want to do too much too soon.  I see this every semester with students who come back to school some 10 or more years after high school. They believe they have “wasted valuable time” and will now take five classes per term (while continuing to work and take care of a family). Unfortunately, they do not have (yet) the academic chops to do this.  Remember, small and steady will win the race.  Overreaching and over-promising (even yourself) can have devastating time and confidence consequences.  Don’t kill your own momentum before you give it a chance to build.
  •        Too little discipline—but lots of positive words?
    •        To accomplish any goal discipline is required.  Talking will not get you to the result.  Consistent effort will.  Positive thinking and self-talk can be powerful. But there has to be substance with the words. No discipline, no plan, no realism, and no action = no goal achievement. I often meet people with lots of superlative words and positive thoughts. (Like, “God will provide for me.”  Well, OK. And didn’t God provide you talents that you have to use?) I had a supervisor who used to always say, “Absolutely fantastic!” whenever he was asked how he was doing.  He wanted to create a positive, can-do, excellent work atmosphere. Unfortunately, when everything is always “absolutely fantastic” the words lose the impact—and everything becomes rote and average at best.  What the person was attempting to create got lost by the redundancy and monotony of the mantra. I recommend Barbara Ehrenreich’s book Bright Sided: How Positive Thinking is Undermining Americafor an interesting view.
  •        Too removed from passion?
    •        Is your goal moving you? Are you excited about it? Maybe the reason you are not making progress is that you are not connected emotionally to the goal. Is it your goal or someone else’s?

      Image: Stuart Miles/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

      Image: Stuart Miles/
      FreeDigitalPhotos.net

  •        Too tough on themselves?
    •        Don’t beat yourself up.  More than likely, you will stumble.  Recalibrate and move on. Again, slow and steady.
  •        Too fearful—of yourself and your critics?
    •        But I might fail!  What will “they” say? Yep, you might stumble–and the critics might be ready to pounce. And you might succeed! If you don’t take a step forward, how do you get beyond where you are now?

      Video recommendation for the week:

      Big goals can scare us. We feel vulnerable.  Brené Brown reminds us how this can be motivating. The doers get things done…the critic doesn’t.


Goals are powerful motivators. Setting them is the first step.  Are they realistic? Are they connected to whom you are as a person? What are you doing to get to the goals? Disciplined movement and continually re-calibration can help you stay on track.

Make it a wonderful week—H.T.R.B. as needed.

Check out my website (http://www.stevepiscitelli.com/programs.html) for programming information as well as details about upcoming webinars  (http://www.stevepiscitelli.com/webinars).

Information on my newest book, Choices for College Success (3rd ed.), can be found at Pearson Education.

 (c) 2014. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

 


%d bloggers like this: