(Issue #572) Determining Relevance: Three Words


Consider three words—three questions—when determining
the relevance of your actions.

During my teaching career (classroom and workshops) providing relevant instruction motivated me each day. The bottom-line question that challenged me: “How does what I do today have relevance for the people in front of me?”

In short, how does it make their lives different even in the smallest way possible? The discussion, the theme, the topic—will any of it help them with their purpose, meaning, and direction?

Think of the great nurses (like my wife) you have known, lived with, or were yourself. Often, they see people at their lowest point in life. Sometimes they are with them when they die. They hold the hands of the patients and family alike. While they cannot bring a dead person to life, they can help that person leave this life with dignity. And they help the family by being there; being present; acknowledging the family’s loss.

Regardless of what you do for a living or the work you do for your community, consider these three words:

  • Before
  • After
  • Because.

Relevance connects to meaning. In the video below, I challenged an audience to consider their relevance to their students. I framed each of the above three words as a question.

Instead of “students,” insert the name or label of the people with whom you interact. How do you answer these as they relate to what you do? The answers may provide insights into why you do what you do. Or, maybe, provide insights about tweaking what you do.

Video recommendation for the Week:


Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.

Click here for more information about the book. In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

Posted in accountability, action, awareness, Being REMARKABLE, Choice, community development | Leave a comment

(Issue #571) IKIGAI


Energetic intersections for meaning.

Building on last week’s post about finding, understanding, and embracing your meaning, let’s turn to the Japanese concept of Ikigai.

Attributed to an Okinawan origin, and consisting of four points of intersection, it refers to life’s purpose.

  • What You Love
  • What You Are Good At
  • What The World Needs
  • What You Can Be Paid For
Photo by Steve Piscitelli

For some, the fourth item of payment for services is not relevant.  Still, the intersection of the first three can energize the individual to the point of excitement for the beginning of a new day as well as a feeling of fulfillment at the end of a day for a purpose pursued.

When the intersection is lost we risk sliding into redundant mediocrity or worse.

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

One of the models I used with my students and audiences looked at the intersection of people, place, and purpose: Pursuing a purpose we love, in a place we love, with people we love. (I think I might have first read about it in a Richard Leider work, but my memory fails me on that point.) The intersection of those three concepts creates personal power.

A life well-lived is a life with purpose. A life that makes a difference, if even for a small part of our world.


Video recommendation for the Week:

This TEDx talk examines Ikigai.


Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, my latest book, can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.

Click here for more information about the book. In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

Posted in life's meaning, Life's purpose, Purpose | Leave a comment

(Issue #570) Purpose and Meaning


Teaching was the how of my why?

Years ago, I developed an acronym which eventually turned into a workshop and keynote speaking topic: P.R.I.D.E.

I challenged my audiences to act with

  • PURPOSE
  • RESPONSIBILITY
  • INTEGRITY
  • DISCIPLINE
  • EQUILIBRIUM

In a 2010 post on this blog, I described PURPOSE as such:

Know your direction and act with specificity.  What is it that drives you? Why do you put your feet on the floor each morning? What pulls you from bed day after day?  While I find long-term goals quite motivating, they can be rather intimidating to others.  In our fast-food-I-want-it-now-world, they lack immediacy. And they require work. Don’t sabotage yourself with shortcuts and—dare I say—laziness.  Evaluate your goal and the steps you must take to make the goal a reality. If you really want it, start with one step—even if it is a small step.

But what happens when that purpose is lost or obfuscated? What happens when you find nothing compelling enough to pull you from bed each morning other than a list of projects? Do you still have a purpose?

For instance, during my four decades of classroom teaching, speaking, facilitation, and writing I saw those activities as conduits for my purpose to help people build relationships, resources, and resilience. For me, easily identifiable.

Six years ago I retired from classroom teaching. When I walked away from campus on that final day in May of 2015 I still had my purpose to facilitate conversations through workshops and writing. I would make a difference on a larger stage with more people. I thought.

Two years ago, I made the conscious decision to step away from traveling to national speaking engagements. I wanted to focus my efforts on my writing, pet therapy, and local community issues. This time, my focus turned to a smaller stage.

Somewhere, though, my thoughts got jumbled and distracted.  The further I moved from classroom teaching and speaking, the more I felt like I had lost my purpose. Had I become an invisible soul creating and completing little projects with no connecting purpose?

Serendipitously, last week I re-read Viktor E. Frankl’s classic Man’s Search for Meaning and have come to question the concept of purpose. Or more specifically, the manner in which I have used the word.

Frankl made the case that “man’s search for meaning is the primary motivation in his life….” In essence, a person’s why for living. Quoting Nietzsche, he wrote “He who has a why to live for, can bear with almost any how.

Perhaps I had come to confuse what my purpose was with what my ego desired. If the stage I stood on was not large and visible to many, then (in my devolving way of thinking) I must have lost my purpose. The incessant drive of ego confused my true meaning. As I reflect on that now, I can see the error in my thinking. Borrowing the words from an Abigail Johnson post, “I decided not to hide any longer.” I needed to confront the dilemma: Had I lost purpose or had I lost ego-satisfying opportunities?

Some of the most poignant and purposeful moments of my classroom teaching came in one-on-one conversations with students after class, in the library, walking down the hallway, in the cafeteria, or during office hours. Connecting with another human being. Small stage with consequential results.

For me, the why was not speaking or teaching, it was in the authentic connections achieved through those activities.

Teaching was the how of my why? The same with speaking and writing.

I have come to see that my meaning remains to forge connections. What has changed is my how. Especially when times get tough (like a pandemic). In the video below, you will hear of Frankl’s take on the connection of suffering (a how) and meaning (the why).

It can become easy to confuse ego, purpose, and meaning.

As you evolve, perhaps your stage (your how) gets smaller. You may even feel invisible (compared to a previous period in your life). That does not, however, indicate you have lost your meaning for life.

One last example to drive this home. Yesterday I got a phone call from a 90-year old former professor of mine (from undergraduate days). She needed help with something in her home. I drove to her house, took care of that issue and helped her with a computer issue as well. Small stage AND big impact for my mentor and myself.

You have to understand your evolving how to help connect to your life-supporting why.


Video recommendation for the Week:


Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.

Click here for more information about the book. In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

Posted in growth, intentionality, life's meaning, Purpose, resilience | 2 Comments

(Issue #569) Stayca


On August 22, 1998, The Florida Times-Union (Shorelines) published an article of mine titled “Best Vacations Are Those At Comfortable, Easy-to-Reach Sites.”

In that article, I described a virtual vacation (a Staycation) my wife I and took right here in our hometown of Atlantic Beach, Florida.

Fast forward to 2020 and 2021 and there have been more virtual things than we had ever planned for—and the last thing many want is a virtual vacation (or virtual anything for that matter). They desire to get away, experience different locales, eateries, entertainment venues, and cultures.

As I re-read that 23-year old (!) article it reminded of the importance of appreciating our own community and what it has to offer. Whether you live in a bustling metropolis, a sleepy mountainside cabin, or on a breezy island, you probably have community treasures that make where you live a slice of paradise for you.

This past week, Laurie and I did a one-day Stayca in which we minimized our “to-do” list and slowed down to enjoy our community and each other’s company all day long. Starting with a sunrise beach walk to breakfast and ending with dinner a block off the ocean, we enjoyed a slower pace in a place we love—our community.

In the words of Jimmy Buffett,

 “The days drift by, they have no names.

 None of the streets here look the same.

There are so many quiet places

And smiling eyes to match the smiling faces.

I have found me a home. I have found me a home.

You can take the rest of everything I own.

Because I have found me a home.

(“I Have Found Me A Home.” 1973)

May you be able to appreciate the nooks and crannies of your community this coming week-and beyond.


Video Recommendation for the Week:

I shot this video in 2014 when Laurie and I returned from another Stayca in Atlantic Beach, Florida. (Note: I added captions as the wind noise created some difficulties for the audio.)


Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.

Click here for more information about the book. In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order and enjoy:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

Posted in Appreciation, Community, home, resilience | Leave a comment

(Issue #568) Community As A Pathway To Dreams


One’s dreams, goals, desires, and vision, connect to one’s overall journey.

NOTE: Below is an excerpt from my book Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019, pp. 85-87). As an example of finding pathways and agency to a goal, it references the Atlantic Beach (Florida) Songwriters Night. For the past year, this monthly event has been placed on hold due to the pandemic. But it is making it’s way back to the stage—if only virtually for the time being. A community awaits to re-embrace this treasure of social capital.

Now for the excerpt:

Research tells us that hope requires three ingredients: goals + pathways + agency.

*The goal that attracts and draws your attention must be valuable to you and/or your community.

*A pathway—a plausible route to the goal—must be present.

*And, you intuit that you have the ability, the power, and the talent to reach that goal.

Mentors can assist along the pathway. They can help us discover the agency we have not yet recognized in ourselves. We may think of mentors as solo entities, individuals sharing expertise. If one mentor can change a life, think what a community of mentors can do. That’s what the Atlantic Beach, Florida, Songwriters’ Night has provided since 2003.

From the beginning, we (the organizers) hoped to be a pathway for our community members.  A pathway for songwriters to share their talents, gain confidence, and connect with like-minded creative types.  It would also be a pathway for the audience. Neighbors entertaining neighbors while enjoying the company of other neighbors. And for some of the performers, SWN has become one step toward a larger goal related to music, songwriting, and performing.

Over the years, adults have shared the stage with children of the community. These young artists test and hone their musical skills in a true listening-room environment.

For the audience, the event exemplifies the concept of social capital. It serves as a community laboratory to help all ages, of varying abilities, to chase down their dreams. In between songs, before the event, or after the lights go dark, the audience talks about things other than music like neighborhood schools, workplace opportunities, home improvement projects, or important community issues. Spin-off events have occurred as well.

A beach venue for dreams helps create a pathway for other such venues.

And hope lives. When people take time to listen to and give gratitude for the gifts of others, community strengthens. 



Video recommendation for the Week:

Rather than a video this week, how about a podcast recommendation?

This podcast episode accompanied the release of my book. You will hear Mike Shackelford (the host-musician-songwriter-face-of-SWN) and one of the young artists speak of the power of goals, pathways, and agency.



Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click here
.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.

Click here for more information about the book. In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

Posted in Community, Dreams, Goals, resilience | Leave a comment

(Issue #567) Purpose: Collecting or Connecting Dots?


None of us knows for sure where we will be in 10 years or 10 days.
Are you marking time or making a difference with your time?

We all have a purpose. Sometimes, though, we might have a difficult time defining it, seeing it, or appreciating it. Purpose can seem illusory, frustrating, changing, remote, and too much work to figure out.

In a commencement address delivered to the graduating class of Florida State College at Jacksonville on May 11, 2017, I encouraged the graduates to focus on three aspects of life: Rainbows, Relationships, and Resilience.  Each is part of our purpose.

I encouraged them to never stop asking intentional and meaningful questions about things that matter—about their purpose. Even when that proved difficult—in fact, especially when it proves difficult. 

Here (in part) is what I said about their Rainbows (goals and dreams) that day in the Veterans Memorial Coliseum. Maybe it can provide a jumpstart for any of us who may be searching. The Video of the Week below features my entire address.

“…Consider how you will stay relevant. What got you here will not be enough to get you there. How will you continue to develop the skills needed to work with multiple generational attitudes in the workplace where you will find differing perspectives when it comes to purpose, place, and people?  How will you remain open to and find life-growing possibilities? ….

“Over the course of your lifetime you have done a lot, seen a lot, gathered a lot, read a lot, worked a lot, written a lot, planned a lot, talked a lot, tweeted a lot, posted a lot, Instagrammed a lot, and ____ (you fill in the blank) a lot.  Each one of those experiences represents a dot on your lifeline. You have gathered thousands of dots on your journey. And you will gather thousands more. What do you do with those dots? A colleague of mine from California reminded me that we might spend too much time collecting dots and not enough time connecting those dots. Are the dots in your life meaningful? Do you savor and appreciate them? Or do you just collect them like tally marks on a scoreboard? …

“In the 1950s, Casey Stengel managed the New York Yankees.  One day as he looked out on the field, he told a coach next to him, ‘You see that young fella over there? He’s 20 year’s old. In 10 years he’s going to be an All Star.’ And then he pointed to another place on the field, ‘You see that other young man out there. He’s also 20 years old…and in 10 years…he’ll be 30.’

“None of us knows for sure where we will be in 10 years or 10 days. The difference, like those two ball players:  Are you just marking time or making a difference with your time? What are you doing with your time? Just collecting dots?….”

I left the graduates with a quote from R.D. Laing:

The range of what we think and do is limited by what we fail to notice.
And because we fail to notice that we fail to notice, there is little we can do to change.
Until we notice how failing to notice shapes our thoughts and deeds.


Video recommendation for the Week:

Here is my complete commencement address (less than 12 minutes).


Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.

Click here for more information about the book. In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

Posted in Dreams, Life's purpose, relevance | Leave a comment

(Issue #566) I Will


Seventy years ago, Marie and Dominic had dreams.
One reaching beyond and the other attempting to create a comfort zone.

As you read the beginning of this post, you might think it is a sad and dreary remembrance. It isn’t.

If my parents were still alive they’d be celebrating their 70th anniversary this month. But they aren’t.

My dad died when I was 16. A few months earlier, they had celebrated their 18th wedding anniversary. Eighteen years to a sophomore in high school seemed like an eternity. Like they had been married, you know, for seventy years or so. They were married longer than I had been alive, and it seemed they’d be married for another 18 and then another 18 and …. But they weren’t.

My father, an 8th-grade dropout during the Great Depression, had two qualities I remember: The ability to connect with people and his penchant to dream. As I think back at how he lived and the things he did (and did not do), he was motivated to create and live within a vision of a world bigger than he had been born into. But he got sidetracked and his dreams were always just out of reach. In short, when it came to where he wanted to go, he didn’t.

My mother was a hard-working operations manager at a trucking company. A high school graduate, she was the breadwinner in our family. The one who paid attention to the needed details.  She did not take many risks. Possibly over compensating for my dad’s penchant for high stakes, she held her cards close. My mother helped me to understand that little steps are important. In fact, over the years I came to realize a larger lesson that no matter how small (or maybe even insignificant) a step might seem, it isn’t.

Seventy years ago, Marie and Dominic had dreams of their own. One reaching beyond a comfort zone, the other attempting to maintain a comfort zone. Each step they took represented, to them, an important movement toward a larger goal. I learned from them that achievement of large goals (dreams) requires consistent effort over the long haul. My life is the sum of the small and consistent choices I make and do each day. If I fail to pay attention and act with intention each day, then, as for those dreams reaching fruition, they won’t.

Thanks, Mom and Dad. Because of you, I will.

Happy anniversary!



Video recommendation for the Week:

In this video clip from a presentation I delivered in Portland, OR, I make the argument for understanding what is non-negotiable in our lives. And I make the point that, “When the negotiables start taking control of your life, guess what they have become. Non-negotiable.”  Thus derailing your dreams.



Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click here.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.

Click here for more information about the book. In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

Posted in Dreams, parental guidance, Priority management | 2 Comments

(Issue #565) Offering A Hand Or An Opinion?


At that moment they might not need to know how much I know
but, rather, how much I care.

The conclusion of a recent letter to the editor in the local paper caught my attention: “So I ask, if you see a person in need, do you offer a hand or an opinion?”

When someone or some group reaches out for assistance, how do we respond? With compassion and non-judgment. Or do we have to opine about what is wrong with that person or group—especially if our background and experiences do not match what they have encountered? We can become tribe-centric.

Maybe the person in need does, in fact, require some readjustment and realignment. Perhaps they need an ear to listen. Or an empathetic being to help him or her navigate the rocky shoals.

Photo by Steve Piscitelli ©2019

During my classroom teaching years I recall many knocks on my office door by students in need. Sometimes they had academic questions; often they confronted crippling personal dilemmas. And many times those issues were beyond what I had experienced in my life. Like the young women who shared they had been abused by a significant other. My duty in those moments was to get them connected with a counselor who could help—a person trained in such situations.  It was not the time or place to share my opinions about how to pick a partner.  That was not the need for the person in front of me.

Less dramatic or trauma-inducing, think of the friend who shares ideas she wants to share on her next office Zoom meeting. You hear something that might present a problem for her. Maybe it is the manner in which she is presenting or the order of her presentation or the depth or …. Do you offer your opinion about what she is doing wrong or do you offer a hand by sharing some authentic observations? Feedback that she can use—or not—to tweak her delivery.

It might help to ask ourselves, “What does this person need right now? My opinion or my hand? A talking head or someone to lean on?”

I thank the letter writer (above) for reminding me that it’s not about me, it’s about the person in front of me. At that moment they might not need to know how much I know but, rather, how much I care.



Video recommendation for the Week:

Bill Withers and “Lean on Me.”    




Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click here.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.
Click here for more information about the book.

In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • My book, Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019)(print and e-book) is available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Check out my book Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017). One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

The Growth and Resilience Network®.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.

©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

Posted in Life lessons | Leave a comment

(Issue #564) Perspective


A change in perspective might help us see variety, beauty, glory, and hope.

“Not quite as vibrant this morning, was it? But it is always great to see.  Never tire of it.”

The observation came from a Parks and Recreation official Roxie and I see from time to time on our sunrise beach walks.  Some mornings the clouds add various textures, levels, and vibrancy to the colors as the sun pops out from the water. Other days, what the clear blue sky may lack in variety of hues it gives back with a brilliant glow that bounces off the waves crashing to the shore.

2018-12-19 07.08.26

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

That is when I look for a different perspective. It might be shadows cast by the sea oats or the reflections off beachfront homes. Or I might catch the morning light as it gives a luminous glow to a darkened patio light.

DSC03895

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Each day brings something new. Sometimes we have to search a bit harder to find that offering. It’s too easy to say, “Oh, seen it before. Nothing new here.”

As I took the photo of that light above, two thoughts—metaphors—came to mind.

  • On days that seem to be filled with anything but clearness and brightness, the clouds give texture to our life. They may be there to force us to look at the unfolding day with different eyeglasses.
  • On days that may not seem as vibrant and exciting as we would like, a change in perspective might help us see variety, beauty, glory, and hope.

We have to be willing to change our perspective.


Video recommendation for the Week:

Speaking of sunrise…a video I shot a few years ago and the different perspectives that it offered as the day dawned.


Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click here.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.
Click here for more information about the book.

In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • My book, Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019)(print and e-book) is available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Check out my book Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017). One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

The Growth and Resilience Network®.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.

©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

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(Issue #563) Your Future Self


What do you want to say to your Future Self?

In 2012 I discovered a tool to help my students challenge themselves and then hold themselves accountable for that challenge. The site: FutureMe.

In short, FutureMe allows users to craft and send emails (today) to themselves that will arrive in the future. Type an email to the future, set a date for delivery, and on that date it will pop up in your Inbox. Or as the site described it at that time:

Send your future self some words of inspiration. Or maybe give ’em swift kick in the pants. Or just share some thoughts on where you’ll or what you’ll be up to in a year, three years…more? And then we’ll do some time travel magic and deliver the letter to you. FutureYou, that is. Getting a surprise from the past is actually kind of an amazing thing….

I had used an analog version that my students filled out in class, placed it in a self-addressed envelope, and then I mailed it to them in a  few weeks.  A reminder of what they said they would do.

The beauty of FutureMe (the site) is that it allows the user to pick any date in the future.  I asked my students to set a goal (or multiple goals) for the semester, enter those goals into FutureMe, and then set the date to receive that email to coincide with the last week or so of the semester. It became a reality check. What worked and what did not? Where did they fall short? Where did they succeed beyond their expectations?  What steps did they need to take heading into the next semester?

Image: Laurie Piscitelli

As Seth Godin wrote in a recent post, … Maybe you’d express some optimism that you could turn into action. And maybe you’d develop some empathy for your past self, who was just doing the best you could.”

What do you want to say to your Future Self? Type it, send it, and it see what your Current Self had to say about your Future Self. Maybe this feedback will help you develop the next challenge to your Future Self.


Video recommendation for the Week:

Can your FutureMe peek through the clouds and rain? Listen to James Fortune and Fiya.


Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My latest book can be found in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click here.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.
Click here for more information about the book.

In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • My book, Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019), (print and e-book) is available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Check out my book Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017). One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts (all 50 episodes) can be found here.

The Growth and Resilience Network®.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.

©2021. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

 

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