(Issue #620) Volunteer and Grow


You give of yourself because the giving makes the act about the other person,
not about you.

~~~~~

One of the organizations for whom Roxie and I volunteer asked me to participate in a video interview about volunteering. Why volunteer for the organization? What drew me to the organization? And so on. The bottom line for all the questions: Why is volunteering important?

Obviously, the act giving service helps the people and communities for whom you volunteer. You contribute a free service (for the most part) that provides needed assistance. You leave another being, hopefully, better than when you arrived on the scene.

You give of yourself because the giving makes the act about the other person, not about you.

When I offer time to my community, I think of giving back and establishing meaningful connections. And the literature supports that. For instance, Western Connecticut State University found that volunteering strengthens and makes a difference for your community and brings people together.  WCSU also found that stepping up to the line promotes personal growth and self-esteem. While volunteering aids the people around you, it benefits the volunteers as well. They learn more about themselves. They volunteered to help others and, concomitantly, they received a benefit. A symbiotic relationship develops.

Young people (think high school and college students) may volunteer to gain experience and build a resume. And in the process, they learn about their communities and continue to understand who they are, what moves them, and what skills they have that their neighbors need.

When we volunteer, we gain personal perspective on how we can inspire, impact, and initiate community.

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

Listen to this moving TEDx talk about the importance of volunteerism for a community.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in Community, community service, volunteering | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

(Issue #619) Turtles, Giraffes, and Roosters


For what and/or for whom are you ready to crow about this coming week?

~~~~~

We’ve all heard the idiom to stick your neck out. It is used when you embark on an endeavor that entails a level of risk to yourself. When you expose your neck you take the chance of failure, ridicule, and setback. At the same time, that extended neck can be the impetus for success, acclaim, and progress. Keeping the neck in the same place (the safe place?) may reduce risk as well as chances for success.

While we might consider sticking out our neck to be about us, it can also be about someone else. For instance, when we speak in support of a marginalized person or group, we face consequences for what we have said or done.

The animal world helps us humans visualize this risk-taking activity. (Of course, chickens and turkeys might take exception as sticking their necks out probably involves a chopping block.)

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Think of the turtles having to stick their necks out to move forward. If they keep their heads safely tucked inside the shell, it is protected but at the expense of forward progress. Danger passes, out comes the neck. Progress delayed.

Same for larger animals. Consider this quote attributed to Sid Waddell.

“Well as the giraffes say, you don’t get no leaves if you don’t stick your neck out.”

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

And for animals in between. While reading The Ultimate Book of Useless Information, I noted a risk-taking move associated with barnyard beings.

“Roosters cannot crow if they are not able to fully extend their necks.”

Roosters are known to crow as a method to stake out their territory. Yet the image of the extended neck provides an apt metaphor for putting ourselves out there. We make sure people see and hear us.

For what and/or for whom are you ready to crow about this coming week?

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

When we stick our necks out, we (probably) have thought about what we are doing (even if for a moment or two) and believe it is worth the risk.

Buffalo Springfield asked us to consider For What It’s Worth (released in 1966).

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in risk-taking | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

(Issue #618) Getting There, Not Being There


On the way to being there what do we miss along the path of getting there.

~~~~~


In his book No Time Like the Future: An Optimist Considers Mortality, Michael J. Fox helps us understand his journey with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Along the way, he ends up teaching us about living a mindful life.

For instance, during one of his physical therapy sessions to strengthen and stabilize his gait, Fox had the revelation that,

“The key to walking to the other side of the room is not being there but getting there.”

In other words, don’t get ahead of yourself.

I dogeared the page.

How many times have I lost touch with what was in front of me because I was two thoughts beyond my reach or two street blocks ahead of my walk or two months ahead into my future? (Too many times.)  Or I move so fast I miss the beauty right in front of me? (Like when I almost missed the bunny and the deer in Boulder.)

For instance, the other night Laurie asked me a question while I was setting my glass down. Rather than focus on where I placed the glass, I turned my attention to answering the question. Result: Glass tumbled to the floor–breakage and spillage. And no answer for the question.

Roxie wrote of this in her Story #25 (“Focus on the Present”) in her book.

“Steve always seems to be focused on where he is going; where he needs to be; or what he needs to get done…Steve’s focus on our walks is often where we are going. He wants to arrive…get around…and return…He misses so much along the way.”

Smart canine.

We can lose sight of the present moment when we focus narrowly on the future.

One might say, “OK. But don’t we have to, at some point, consider being there? Don’t we have to focus on the goal in order to reach the goal?

True, we need to focus on our goals—and they are in the future. The question that still presents itself is “When is at some point? Can’t we still enjoy the steps along the way—the people, the experiences, the bright spots, and not-so-bright spots?

Fox (and Roxie) talk about how we need to move our attention to the steps in front of us on the way to the destination. When we don’t, what do we miss? Consider this final example.

Roxie and I walk three blocks to the ocean each morning. I consider what the sunrise holds for us when we arrive on the sand. I see us being there on the beach. One day, I decided to stop focusing on being at the beach and appreciate what we pass by getting there. To help me adjust my mindset, I asked myself, “How many palm trees do I think we pass on the way to the beach?” Keep in mind that I had been making this walk for a few decades. “Oh, probably 30 or 40. Maybe 50,” I thought.

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Wrong. One house alone has nearly 30 palm trees. The total number within the three-block stretch: over 200. Experiences I mindlessly passed each day. Beauty taken for granted. And that is only one of many on that short route.

How many experiences are you missing on your journey?

On the way to being there what do we miss along the path of getting there.

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

One of my favorite sunrise videos. Enjoying the paddle by taking a break from the paddle. Don’t miss the pod of dolphin that suddenly appear! Sometimes the getting there becomes the being there.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in Mindfulness, present-mindedness | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

(Issue #617) Appreciating in Front of Me


Too often we become distracted about what will be or what has been,
at the expense of what is now.
~~~~~

Posts on this blog have addressed the power of staycations. (Like here and here.) And before “virtual” became synonymous with workplace and community meetings, I had written an article for the Florida Times-Union (August 22, 1998; appeared in the Shorelines section of the paper) about how a virtual vacation can help us appreciate what we have in front of us.

You can tell the above article was written 24 years ago. Just look at all that dark hair!

Last week, Laurie and I checked out (and checked in) for another staycation. We threw our backpacks over our shoulders and walked southward on the beach. In fifteen minutes, we arrived at our location. No valet. No lines. No lost baggage. No delays. Just smiles, ocean breezes, and sunshine.

Later that evening, while enjoying a relaxing dinner at one of the Beaches Town Center restaurants, we both noted how we did feel as though we were on vacation. Less than a mile from our home.

For those who follow my Instagram posts, you know I start most of my days appreciating the sun rising over the ocean. A mantra has evolved for me:

Rising Sun
Soothing Sand
Rolling Waves
Comfort Where I Stand

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Too often we become distracted about what will be or what has been, at the expense of what is now. Dings, beeps, chimes, and earbuds draw our attention from what is in front of us.

The latest “stayca” reminded me (again) to appreciate what is in front of me. Now.

A home for thought, heart, and peace.

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

In the words of Jimmy Buffett,

The days drift by, they have no names.
None of the streets here look the same.
There are so many quiet places
And smiling eyes to match the smiling faces.
I have found me a home. I have found me a home.
You can take the rest of everything I own.
Because I have found me a home.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in Appreciation, home, present-mindedness | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

(Issue #616) Create a Call-In Culture


On the way to clarity, we establish connections, and we enhance chances to establish
a “Call-In Culture.”

~~~~~

A previous post on this blog stated,

While simple dichotomies may be deceptively simplistic, they can provide a starting point for conversation and movement. Each day we can provide light or darkness. We provide direction or obfuscation. With every decision and interaction, we can choose various paths.

We can choose various paths.

Like making the choice between a call-out or a call-in. Times, people, and situations present themselves when a call-out­ might be needed; when no other way seems appropriate to the circumstance. But where does one draw the line? When might what seems appropriate be inappropriate? When is the call-out an excuse to belittle, ridicule, and demean someone with whom we disagree? Rather than discuss (and maybe learn), we degrade and yell.

Photo (c) by Steve Piscitelli

A call-in provides another option—another path. Consider it a reach-out. When we reach out to someone with a differing opinion, we seek conversation. Deliberative dialogues force us to listen, question (authentically), share, and, maybe, adjust our focus.

Perhaps our curiosity will help us gain clarity. On the way to clarity, we establish connections, and we enhance chances to establish a Call-In Culture.

The Greater Good MagazineMarch 2022 Happiness Calendar” reminds us to stay open and curious.

Finally, in a quote attributed to Jesse Jackson, “We must turn to each other and not on each other.

Reach out. Call in. Connect.

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

Reaching out can happened in various environments. Like a school cafeteria or a community meeting.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in Life lessons | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

(Issue #615) Have You Run Out Of Songs?


Like my hunt for an agent, if I stop listening and creating,
I doubt the muse will start typing the next manuscript for me.

~~~~~

Ever feel like your creativity well has gone dry? It could be creativity for dinner menus at home. Or TV shows to watch after dinner. Or planning impactful community programs. Or your workout regimen.

I run into it from time to time with my writing. When I’m on, the words and images flow. At other times, crickets.

Case in point.  For more than a year, I have been shopping the manuscript for my first novel. Sent out more than sixty queries to agents across the nation. To date, I am 0 for 60+. Not a nibble. In fact, other than one response, the others have been either passive rejections (that is, their websites say something like, “If you don’t hear from us in 6-12 weeks consider that we have passed on your submission.”) or they have been robotic email rejections.

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

While I have expected that kind of response/lack of response, the constant flow of rejection has had an adverse impact on my creativity. I still get my blog post out every week, yet, at times, I struggle with larger projects. Has the muse left me? Or have I left the muse?

I wonder how the prolific writers do it. Luck, talent, discipline, a combination of all?

Last week, I re-visited Lodi. Not the actual California town but, rather, the lyrics by John Fogarty and Creedence Clearwater Revival. Specifically, the third verse.

The man from the magazine said I was on my way.
Somewhere I lost connections, ran out of songs to play.
I came into town, a one-night stand. Looks like my plans fell through.

Oh Lord. Stuck in Lodi again.

Have I run out of songs to play? Has my creativity dried up? Should I just close the laptop and move on to some other venture? No muse, no words, no product.

While that might be the easy thing to do for some, quitting on my creativity does not work for me. Perhaps the challenge resides with the discipline required to create, write, and produce. In a quote attributed to Chilean author Isabel Allende, I was reminded that if I stop showing up, the muse might never show itself.

“Show up, show up, show up, and after a while the muse shows up, too.”

In his book On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft, Stephen King said something similar,

“Don’t wait for the muse. As I’ve said, he’s a hardheaded guy who’s not susceptible to a lot of creative fluttering. This isn’t the Ouija board or the spirit-world we’re talking about here, but just another job like laying pipe or driving long-haul trucks. Your job is to make sure the muse knows where you’re going to be every day from nine ’til noon. Or seven ’til three. If he does know, I assure you that sooner or later he’ll start showing up.”

Like my hunt for an agent, if I stop listening and creating, I doubt the muse will start typing the next manuscript for me.

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

If we face the blank page, we could draw the conclusion that we lack the skill or passion for what we are doing. We could wait for a miracle to intervene. We, also, could be more proactive and seek out mentors to guide us. Perhaps, as needed, take a well-deserved break, and regroup our cognitive, emotional, and writing skills. And we can keep showing up.

One thing I have found for certain, if I stop showing up—if I am not ready to listen to the muse and dedicate effort—I will lose connection and run out songs to play. To have songs to play—my songs, my creativity—I must do the work of writing.

I. Must. Do. The. Work.

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

Creedence Clearwater Revival sings Lodi.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in perseverance, resilience | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

(Issue #614) Personal Mantras


Reflective Skies

Placid Seas

Inner Voice

Quiet, Please!

~~~~~

At a friend’s suggestion, I read about finding and/or creating a personal mantras. One site suggested one hundred mantras—and a four-point strategy to develop your own. You can check it out here.

According to the article,

A mantra is something that you repeat either aloud or in your mind to focus your thoughts and energy…A mantra – the focus of this article – is a word or phrase designed to help you change your thinking in the present moment. A mantra is used when your mind has drifted off course and you want to steer it back to more positive waters.

We’ve all been in that space where our thoughts have been captured, hijacked, and convoluted by that voice in your ear. The voice may be well-meaning, yet it still sends us down rabbit holes.

As I developed my personal mantras, it was not surprising to me that most involved the beach. That is where I draw my deepest breath and quiet my mind. Especially at sunrise. That experience always reminds me of the present moment.

Below you will find six personal mantras I crafted. I hope the visual of the photos and the words will inspire. I do not claim any authority or pedigree at all in mantra development. (I have none.) This is a work in progress for me. These words and images came to my mind and work for me. I will continue to fine-tune.

Perhaps you have found a mantra you use and would like to share.

Clouds of White

Birds in Flight

Helps Me Focus on Inner Light

~~~~

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Rising Sun

Soothing Sand

Rolling Waves

Comforting Where I Stand

~~~~

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Like the New Day

My Life has Promise

~~~~

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Reflective Skies

Placid Seas

Inner Voice

Quiet, Please!

~~~~

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Behind the Fog, Beauty

~~~~~

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Purpose

Responsibility

Integrity

Discipline

Equilibrium

Video recommendation for the week.

His young son saved his life with a three-word mantra.

We all have the power to overcome what seem like insurmountable obstacles, Bhava Rham tells us in this TEDx talk.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in Mindfulness | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

(Issue #613) Tao Te Ching: Perspective on Life with Integrity


Even the down times—those times when we seem confused and falling short of our goals—
have lessons to teach.

~~~~~

Reading a translation (by Stephen Mitchell) of Tao Te Ching I was taken by seeming contradictions (to my mind) that Lao-tzu used to teach about a life lived with integrity.  Such as:

…Being and non-being create each other.

Difficult and easy support each other.

Long and short define each other.

High and low depend on each other.

Before and after follow each other…. (Verse #2)

As I explored other verses, the lessons began to take shape in my mind and offer a path—a way—to think about a life lived with purpose. The Tao’s meaning was getting through to me. Perhaps as we work with head down, we lose sight of what is in us, in front of us, above us, beneath us, and behind us. We lose perspective.

Fill your bowl to the brim

And it will spill.

Keep sharpening your knife

And it will blunt.

Chase after money and security

And your heart will never unclench.

Care about people’s approval

And you will be their prisoner.

Do your work, then step back.

Then only path to serenity. (Verse #9)

Even the down times—those times when we seem confused and falling short of our goals—have lessons to teach. Times we feel behind, exhausted, and/or in danger present themselves for contemplation and growth. Because if we mindlessly sharpen, sharpen, and sharpen some more (see Verse #9 above), we could end up dulling our senses, emotions, morality, and perspective. A light guides us-if we heed it.

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

…There is a time for being ahead,

A time for being behind;

A time for being in motion,

I time for being at rest;

A time for being vigorous,

A time for being exhausted;

A time for being safe,

A time for being in danger…. (#29)

The way to ourselves requires us to pause and listen to others and ourselves.

Knowing others is intelligence;

Knowing yourself is true wisdom.

Mastering others is strength;

Mastering yourself is true power…. (#33)

And…

Those who know don’t talk.

Those who talk don’t know…. (#56)

Or as Mitchell states in his Foreword, we need to move toward doing not-doing. Less and less do you need to force things…

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

In his nod to the Tao, Willie Nelson sings (Live at Farm Aid 1993) “Still is Still Moving to Me”.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in Life lessons | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

(Issue #612) Five Stand-Out Team Member Behaviors


Look at each of the five behaviors and notice a connecting thread:
An on-going sense of curiosity .

~~~~~

An article in Fast Company. “Employee Engagement is Out. Here’s a Better Metric”,(February 8, 2022) describes “five key behaviors that employees who produce great work demonstrate.”

As you read the workplace behaviors described below, consider the carryover for other teamwork environments (community committees, HOAs, neighborhood athletic leagues, church groups, or local governing bodies). Those producing “great work” do the following:

  • “Ask the right questions, like How might this task/process/problem be made easier/faster/safer/better?
  • “Go and see, which may mean standing on an assembly line or watching users interact with a product.
  • “Talk to an outer circle, gathering information and insight from a broad array of experts.
  • “Improve the mix, continually fine-tuning and improving upon their work.
  • “Deliver the difference, remaining laser-focused on positive outcomes.”

The bottom line, according to the company that conducted the study, was that the difference-making employees went beyond engagement with colleagues (which is important), to demonstratable and quantifiable outcomes. Engagement has its place, but it does not always equate with mission or output.

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Look at each of the five behaviors above and notice a connecting thread: An on-going sense of curiosity by the team members doing great work. Questioning. Exploring. Conversing. Fine-tuning. And, finally, delivering a product based on the authentic path of curiosity.

Building on the five behaviors for great work, five employee archetypes present themselves: Socializers, Builders, Achievers, Taskers and Coasters.

Which one of the archetypes do you think ranks the most productive and which one the least? Check out the article…and see what application there might be for the teams with whom you engage.

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

Elizabeth Gilbert reduces the archetypes to two: Jackhammers and Hummingbirds.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in curiosity, teamwork | Tagged | Leave a comment

(Issue #611) Who You Hang With Makes A Difference


Whether we call this a pod, social circle, monthly book club, or exercise group, this tribe knows and demonstrates the importance of developing authentic connections.

~~~~~

Dan Buettner’s Blue Zones focus on the Power 9® model evolved from research into what made for longevity of life in certain locales around the world. Nine interconnected “common denominators” showed themselves to be key to healthy living:

  1. Move Naturally (the environment creates/promotes opportunities to move)
  2. Purpose (passion for what you do)
  3. Down Shift (stress reduction)
  4. 80% Rule (eating to only 80% full)
  5. Plant Slant (healthy diet)
  6. Wine at 5 (moderate alcohol consumption with friends and/or meals)
  7. Belong (faith-based community)
  8. Loved ones first (importance of family)
  9. Right Tribe (social circle that continually supports healthy habits)
Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Many previous posts on this blog have looked at purpose and interconnectedness. (Like this and this.) Today let’s remind ourselves of the importance of #9 above, the Right Tribe.

Whether we call this a pod, social circle, monthly book club, or exercise group, this tribe knows and demonstrates the importance of developing authentic connections. Not transitory. Not exploitive. Not me-centered. Consider:

  • Years ago, Richard Leider wrote about nutritious people. They are the antidote to energy vampires. Leider encouraged us to surround ourselves with “people [who] have three primary characteristics: their face lights up when you come in the room, they listen to you, and they have few (i.e., no) plans for your improvement!” The opposite? People who show no enthusiasm for your presence, do not listen to you, and constantly tell you how you could be/should be better. The right tribe vs. the wrong tribe.
  • The right tribe is not a grouping of strangers. It  consists of committed friends (close and intimate) who know about you, care about, and are there for you. Likewise, you do the same for them. Again, the right tribe.

Buettner’s work found that the Right Tribe, also, connects with mealtime and what you do to make a difference in the world. And if you delve further into the Power 9®, you will see how all can impact each other.

Who do you hang with–and how does it impact your health and wellbeing?

~~~~~

Video recommendation for the week.

This TED talk, Dan Buettner talks about the importance of healthy lifestyle.

~~~~~

Make it a wonderful week and HTRB has needed.

You will find my latest book, Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit, in
eBook ($2.99) and paperback ($9.99) format. Click 
here.

My dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story. Please, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019print and e-book). Available on Amazon. More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at the above link.
  • Stories about Teaching: No Need to be an Island (2017, print and e-book)Available on Amazon. One college’s new faculty onboarding program uses the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos (see the link above) would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

You can find my podcasts (all fifty episodes) here.

You will find more about me at www.stevepiscitelli.com.


©2022. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®
Atlantic Beach, Florida

Posted in Life lessons | 2 Comments