(#422) Ask. Listen. Act.


Noise abounds as people tell us what we should and should not.
Perhaps we do the same to others.

I stood in the back of an auditorium in New Mexico.  In ten minutes, I would be introduced to an audience of about 1,000 public school teachers. They had come to hear me for their professional development day.

One of the organizers leaned over and whispered in my ear. “You got a big group today! And, about 900 of them don’t want to be here.” He smiled.

Thanks!

Later this summer, I will facilitate  a four-hour workshop for 125 to 150 community college faculty.  The organizer told me that the event will be mandatory for the faculty.

One would hope the people forced to attend “training” would have input into what the program would cover. In my experience, that rarely happens.

I have written on this blog about the importance—the necessity—to ask questions, listen, and then act considering the information gathered. You can read those posts here and here.

At a community meeting this week, I noticed a similar dynamic.  Knowledgeable, civil, compassionate, and respectful people sat around the table with thoughts, plans, and initiatives for what we could do for our community.  Great ideas of how to help people and improve well-being. What was not part of the initial comments was the question, “Have we asked the people (our neighbors) what they want or need?”  Simple. Yet often overlooked in the hurry to do what we “know” is the right thing to do.

Noise abounds as people will gladly tell us what we should or should not do. Perhaps we do the same to others. (Probably do!)  At times, we go for the quick answer or (what we think is the) resolution and miss the eloquence of pertinent questions.

Ask authentic and meaningful questions.  Listen and ask more questions. Act with purpose, direction, and support.


Video recommendation for the week.

Active listening is not easy.  Just ask Ray Romano.


 Make it an inspiring and grateful week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my book, Stories about Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.  A few colleges and one state-wide agency have adopted it for training and coaching purposes. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same.

The paperback price on Amazon is now $14.99 and the Kindle version stands at $5.99. Consider it for a faculty orientation or a mentoring program.  The accompanying videos would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts: The Growth and Resilience Network® (http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

My programs and webinars: website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) and (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? (3rd edition).

(c) 2018. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

Posted in assumptions, awareness, Civility, collaboration, Communication, conversation, faculty development, Life lessons, professional development | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

(#421) Step Out, Stretch, and Experience


You make your partner look good. The scene is never about you….

When we learn we either acquire new skills and knowledge or modify old structures of knowing and doing.  It helps us adapt, change, survive, grow, and thrive.  The great teachers in our lives have provided the opportunities for the modifications and acquisitions. They help us step out of our comfort zones and stretch in new directions.

When we cocoon ourselves with the same people, processes, frames of reference, sources of information, activities, and thought patterns we limit perspective. We become mired in what we consider our best practices.  We fail to grow to potential.

For the past two months, I have been a student with an improv comedy workshop.  I have stretched, learned, failed, learned some more, laughed, failed again, collaborated, and grown with nine talented, witty, and encouraging troupe members.

Certain themes resonated with each session. Consider how each of the following can have applicability, beyond the improv stage, to our personal and professional relationships.

  • Give and receive gifts.

o   Good improv starts with the basic “yes, and” premise.  You make your partner look good. The scene is never about you; you make the scene about the scene. You and your partner give each other opportunities to shine and advance the message. This also applies to the audience.  Accept them. Receive them. Without them, you are speaking to yourself.

  • Commit to the scene.

o   Let the people in front of you (your partners and the audience) know who you are and what you are doing. Be specific. Be clear. Be heard. Step out and take a chance. If you fail, your partners will be there for you. If they fail, you will be there for them. See above.

  • Listen and share the stage.

o   While it’s important to be heard, you must share the scene. This requires listening and following. When we all talk, and all increase the volume of the conversation, we end up with chaos.  Know when to modulate or stop talking. Remember, again, it’s not about you. It must be about the overall message.

  • Don’t start a race to the bottom.

o   Do you really need to drop the “F-bomb” or insult a group of people? Once you open the door for lower-level discourse, you give the audience permission to go there. “Oh,” they think, “so it’s that kind of show!  Let’s give ‘em more of that.” When we revert to disrespect we announce that we either cannot do better, or we are too lazy to create at a high level.

  • Laugh and collaborate.

o   Yes, and yes! Learning does not need to be solitary or drudgery.

Being a continual learner gives us opportunities to experience, fail, and grow.  It can be frightening. It can be exhilarating.

Step out, stretch, and experience.


Video recommendation for the week.

Failure can be frustrating.  I like it when I can laugh and learn from it.  As I did from the experiences in this video.  Enjoy!

 


Make it an inspiring and grateful week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my book, Stories about Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.  A few colleges and one state-wide agency have adopted it for training and coaching purposes. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same.

The paperback price on Amazon is now $14.99 and the Kindle version stands at $5.99.

My podcasts: The Growth and Resilience Network® (http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

My programs and webinars: website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) and (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? (3rd edition).

(c) 2018. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

Posted in accountability, awareness, Being REMARKABLE, change, collegiality, Communication, Discipline, Gratitude, growth, habits, laughter, teamwork | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

(#420) Trust As A Core Value


Everyone has a story and our job is to listen.

A few decades years after the Civil War, Clara White, a former slave, saw a need and took action in her Jacksonville, Florida neighborhood.  Some of her neighbors did not have enough to eat. So, she fed what she could to whom she could.   A mission took hold.

Fast forward to the 1930s and the beginning of the Great Depression. Carrying the mission forward, Clara’s daughter, Eartha, began moving the mission from a soup kitchen to a community development center. Today the Clara White Mission feeds, houses, educates, and ministers to the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of the homeless, low-income, and veterans in need.

CEO/President of the CWM, Ms. Ju’ Coby Pittman, told me that each client arrives at the front door “broken, with a laundry bag of challenges,” and in need of someone to believe in and assist them. They need a community of resources.

But how does an agency ministering to the needs of a transient population develop a sense of community? Is that even possible?  Pittman told me it comes down to one core value. Trust.

Trust does not come from words in a mission statement. It grows from authentic relationships having relevant conversations about people’s rainbows. Often, clients do not believe the CWM can do what it says it can.  “How does someone care this much about me?” they wonder.  Enter the trust building process.

The staff members have regular conversations with clients. Recognizing that everyone’s situation is different, the CWM support system connects with the person as an individual.  Once the clients are enrolled and basic survival needs met, they start to see what is possible. They begin to see the relevance of the CWM services to their lives. Rather than passive observers, the clients remain actively involved in their journey. The CWM shares the mission and history of the center with clients. The staff listen to the clients, which in turn makes them feel engaged in the process.  Trust builds. They hear from the “alumni” of the CWM programs tell about their respective journeys. Those stories resonate with the lives of the new clients. Relevance.

 

The mission expects them to give back when they get on their feet. The clients become part of the partnership and they, in turn, help new clients see the relevance in what the CWM does each day for each client.

In fact, Pittman shared that the mission provides “a hand up, not a hand out.” They give back to the community. With unbridled enthusiasm, Pittman states, “It’s not a job; it’s a ministry…this is my purpose.  Everyone has a story and our job is to listen. What we think might be best for them, might not be the best for them.”

Mark Twain reportedly said that the two most important days of a person’s our lives are the day we are born and the day we discover why we were born.

Pittman said she finds her “why,” the relevance for what she does in the motto of Clara and Ertha White:

Do all the good you can,
In all the ways you can,
For all the people you can,
And all the places you can,
While you can.

That is relevant. That forms trust. And it builds community.


Video recommendation for the week.

Click here to hear and see the power of The Miracle on Ashley Street.  Think of the miracles that can happen in your community when people come together, trust one another, and build programs of support and relevance.


Make it an inspiring and grateful week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my book, Stories about Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.  A number of colleges and one state-wide agency have adopted it for training and coaching purposes. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same.

The paperback price on Amazon is now $14.99 and the Kindle version stands at $5.99.

My podcasts: The Growth and Resilience Network® (http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

My programs and webinars: website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) and (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? (3rd edition).

(c) 2018. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

Posted in acceptance, accountability, amplifying, Appreciation, assumptions, Being REMARKABLE, change, Community, community development, courage, dignity, Discipline, fortitude, Goals, habits, health, hope, Integrity, Motivation, resilience, Social responsibility, social ties, transactional leadership, wisdom | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

(#419) What If It Were All Gone?


We allow ourselves to get overwhelmed by the “stuff” of life.
We end up taking a lot for granted. We may even have GDD.  
Gratitude Deficit Disorder.

This past week I’ve been devouring gratitude. Actually, devouring three works by Robert A. Emmons: The Little Book of Gratitude; Gratitude Works; and Thanks!  So many useful nuggets and reminders about gratefulness and being aware.

In one of the works, Emmons references the “principle of scarcity.” When something or someone becomes unavailable—or we think we might never see it again—our gratitude and appreciation for that object reawakens or heightens.

I’ve often read or heard words something like, “If I knew I only had one week left, I’d make sure I witnessed a sunrise/called that long-lost friend/took a walk in the park/listened more deeply/said thank you to my significant other/loved a little longer/went to a music event/hugged my kid this morning/had a wonderful family meal/swam in the ocean/learned to surf/played the piano/….

Interesting that we have 52 weeks a year X the number of years in our lives and it takes knowing we have “only one week left” before we go into high alert and become aware of what we are to lose forever.

Perhaps you have heard of the “George Bailey Effect” named for the main character in It’s a Wonderful Life (1947). George, down on his luck, speculates that the world would have been better if he had not been born.  His guardian angel, Clarence, indulges the thought and leads George through a life that does not include him. A life he never had the chance to impact.  It’s only then that George, with the help of Clarence, realizes he had lost site of the great things in his life.  He sees what the world—and he—would have missed if his wish were realized. His emotions are heightened and he sees with new eyes what he had with wonder and gratitude. He, in essence, experienced the principle of scarcity.

It can happen to any of us when we allow ourselves to get overwhelmed by the “stuff” of life. We end up taking a lot for granted. We have what Emmons refers to as GDD.  Gratitude Deficit Disorder.

Either we do not receive enough and/or we do not offer and recognize enough gratitude in our lives.  If we focus on the offering of gratitude, maybe, just maybe, we see the world a bit differently. We linger a bit longer on the awe of what is in front of us and what it would be mean if the person, the place, or the purpose no longer were in our lives.  We shift attention.

“Gratitude is a way of seeing that alters our gaze,” Emmons said.

We have the control. Do for yourself what Clarence did for George. And perhaps, for a friend, family member or colleague, you can be an “angel” who helps that person focus on the good in life.


Video recommendation for the week.

In this scene, George Bailey has altered his gaze and experiences appreciation, joy, and gratitude.


Make it an inspiring and grateful week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my book, Stories about Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.  A number of colleges and one state-wide agency have adopted it for training and coaching purposes. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same.

The paperback price on Amazon is now $14.99 and the Kindle version stands at $5.99.

My podcasts: The Growth and Resilience Network® (http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

My programs and webinars: website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) and (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? (3rd edition).

(c) 2018. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

Posted in Appreciation, awareness, Choice, Gratitude, growth, Life lessons, love, resilience | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

(#418) Helping A Village Find Its Voice


Listen and respect one another.
Find your voice. Use your voice.
Pursue your rainbows.

 We have heard that the village raises up a child.  What do we do, however, if the village has inadequate infrastructure, health disparities, high crime and poverty, lack of accessible pharmacies and fresh foods, and educational and financial literacy challenges? Threatened on many levels, the village nears the breaking point.

If you’re George Maxey, you listen and help the villagers create a movement.

Maxey has served as the Executive Director of the New Town Success Zone (NTSZ) in Jacksonville, Florida since 2015. Brought to life in 2008 with the help of the Jacksonville Children’s Commission, NTSZ serves an area of about 3,000 to 4,000 people in a small (one to two-mile) geographic zone.  On a recent visit to the Center for the Prevention of Health Disparities at Edward Waters College, Maxey told me about the importance of keeping people connected to their dreams, aspirations, and hopes.

The NTSZ lacked basic resources. The nearest pharmacy was two miles away. It was a food desert. Nevertheless, the founding director (the person before Maxey) reminded the neighbors they could reach their goals. Their personal and neighborhood rainbows were more than fantasies. If they  worked to achieve those dreams they would create their reality.

Maxey carried that message forward. He, also, realized the neighbors needed to organize in order to be heard. They had to create a movement and “build infrastructure and social capital for neighborhoods with significant disparities in child outcomes.” Among other things, he wanted to hear their views about the lingering health disparities in the NTSZ. He gathered the community “gatekeepers” (the defacto leaders) together. And he listened. And he learned. More importantly, he gave the neighbors a platform to develop and share their collective voice.  What were their community goals?

People have to have a say-so about what is going on in their community if we want change to take root.  Maxey asked the gatekeepers, “Where do you want to see the community go? What do you want? What are you willing to do to get what you need to be successful?”

Reminds me of what Queen Latifah told a graduation class, “Home shapes you, make sure you shape it back.”

Dreams give us direction. To move toward the dreams we need to take action. Our actions (or inactions) create our reality. The same for a community.

The neighbors said when the basics of the physical infrastructure (trash pickup, sidewalks, lighting, and blight) challenge daily life, it becomes difficult to focus on and address personal health issues.  Think Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

They needed to get organized in order to be heard.  Maxey asked, “How can I organize the community to have that voice?” He helped form the Vision Keepers who “do the work required to ensure that the children and the families are making adequate progress towards success.”  Accountability reigns.

They collaborated with the sheriff’s office. They invited their city council representative to meetings. They involved HabiJax.  The Vision Keepers understood that for them and their neighbors to grow, the “official” leadership of the city had to understand their needs.  Not by yelling or threatening but by respecting, educating and supporting the leadership.  Speaking. Sharing. Listening.

We can all learn from this civil and respectful approach.

As it moves into its tenth year of existence, NTSZ boasts sustainable and transformative initiatives in the areas of:

  • Education
    • Includes the Two-Generation approach to educate vulnerable children and their caregivers.
  • Community Capacity and Sustainability
    • Includes development of entrepreneurship and leadership skills.
  • Social Wellbeing
    • Includes a community garden and wellness workshops.
  • Employment
    • Includes a career and personal finance center.

Today the glue—the core value—of forming and maintaining respectful relationships holds this community of strong neighbors together. They keep sustainability foremost in view. Neighbors train neighbors.  Maxey believes part of their success comes from their neighbor-to-neighbor focus. It is not about one leader. “We want everyone to be part of the leading process,” he said.

Listen and respect one another.

Find your voice.

Use your voice.

Pursue your rainbows.

And do it all in the name of something bigger than yourself.

To find out more or to join this movement contact 904-470-8899. Or click here.


Video recommendation for the week.


Make it an inspiring and grateful week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my book, Stories about Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.  A number of colleges and one state-wide agency have adopted it for training and coaching purposes. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same.

The paperback price on Amazon is now $14.99 and the Kindle version stands at only $5.99.

My podcasts: The Growth and Resilience Network® (http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

My programs and webinars: website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) and (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? (3rd edition).

(c) 2018. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

Posted in acceptance, accountability, action, Appropriate Behavior, assumptions, authenticity, awareness, Balance, change, Choice, Civility, collaboration, conversation, core values, creating your future, Dreams, empathy, information literacy, Integrity, leadership, Relationship, relevance, resilience, vulnerability, wellbeing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

(#417) Gratitude


Simple acts of gratitude offered, received, and witnessed.

Note to my readers: Today’s post marks the beginning of the 9th year of this weekly blog. Thank you for following, sharing, and commenting.  I am grateful.

Gratitude can manifest in any number of ways. While some may be over-the-top offerings, most come our way in simple acts of heartfelt appreciation, kindness, and thankfulness.

I start my morning meditations with gratitude for people and other beings, opportunities, health, and experiences.  This daily exercise provides gentle reminders.

How do you show gratitude? What acts of kindness have you observed or committed? Perhaps you can build upon the following ideas.

  • Send a handwritten note.
  • Send a text message saying, “I appreciate you!” Bonus: Say why!
  • Leave a voicemail.
  • Volunteer
  • Put down the digital device, turn off the TV, and have a real conversation. Look into the other person’s eyes.
  • Pull in the neighbor’s garbage can.
  • Say, “Thank you.”
  • Round up the tip for the server.
  • Put out the coffee cups and spoons the night before.
  • Set the table. Clear the table.
  • Say, “Thanks for your service” to the custodial staff at the gym, on campus, at work.
  • Respond to an opposing viewpoint with grace—and seek to understand.
  • Place a “Love Bucket” on your desk/in the break room/at the copy machine/by the coffee stand for people to drop in notes of encouragement and thanks. (Note: I did this for a number of years in my classroom. And in my office.)
  • Buy the person behind you a cup of coffee.
  • Join online groups like “Random Acts of Kindness.”

On Facebook, I posed the question, “What are some simple acts of gratitude you have shown or have been a recipient of recently or witnessed?”  Some of the responses included:

  • Wrote a thank you note to a parent volunteer.
  • Was in the hospital and got handmade get well cards from over 200 students…made my day.
  • A friend took me aside at a large event to tell me she had the best afternoon reflecting on my family photos I had posted over the years on Facebook. I was so touched by her care for me.
  • Hubby stopped and said thank you the other night, to a doctor that stayed late and helped out with testing.
  • My ex-husband passed and friends did a fundraiser for my kids.
  • Perfect strangers stepping up to walk my dogs and bring me food while seriously ill in the hospital.
  • When we were homeless, a student who knew of my situation gave me the money to pay for my hotel room for one night.
  • “Good Wishes” jar from my students at a recent course.
  • Sweetest Mother’s Day card ever from a son who obviously “gets it” and appreciates it!
  • A handwritten mother’s day letter from her 11-year old son that incorporated his English class skills!
  • Received a handmade mother’s day card from a girl I baby sit.
  • In the hospital, in a lot of pain and pretty scared … was wheeled back to my room and saw two precious therapy dogs and their copilots! Made my day.
  • Gave a shout out to my network to recommend a colleague for their excellent service.
  • “Oh no, I got this…Happy Mother’s Day!…With that…he covered the difference [I owed at the cash register]. I stammered, through weepy eyes, “Thank you…can I give you a hug?” We did.
  • Took in some elderly people’s garbage cans for them.
  • We helped somebody dock [a boat] while it was raining. They gave us about 5 bags of groceries.
  • When my dad died …three of my [former] students offered to clean up so I could be with my mom and siblings. When I came home, there were fresh flowers and a cooked meal for us!

Gratitude.


 Video recommendation for the week.

Can gratitude improve our wellbeing?  Watch this video.


Make it an inspiring and grateful week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my book, Stories about Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.  A number of colleges and one state-wide agency have adopted it for training and coaching purposes. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same.

The paperback price on Amazon is now $14.99 and the Kindle version stands at $5.99.

My podcasts: The Growth and Resilience Network® (http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

My programs and webinars: website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) and (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? (3rd edition).

(c) 2018. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

Posted in Appreciation, Balance, Community, Gratitude, kindness, resilience, wellbeing | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

(#416) A Safe Place to Land


I kept hearing about the connections between
congregants and neighborhood, congregants and congregants,
as well as congregants and their own souls.

Consider this. It’s 1993. You are an exuberant minister with a young and growing family.  You walk into a church in a high crime-high poverty part of a Southern city. The congregation has dwindled to about twenty-five souls, most hovering around 80 years of age. The church cannot afford to pay you a full salary.

Answer me this: What do you do?

Well, if you were the Reverend Billy Hester, you step into the sanctuary and lead the resurrection of a dying and still proud church.

Today, twenty-five years later, Billy (as he is fondly and commonly known in the area) and that same church boast a vibrant congregation of 650 diverse, committed, supportive souls. On Sundays you will find a packed sanctuary.

I wanted to know what made the difference between shuttering Asbury Memorial United Methodist Church and growing it. What fueled the resilience?  On a recent beautiful spring afternoon Billy and his Lay Leader, Preston Hodges, Jr. sat with me in a church conference room in Savannah, Georgia.  They helped me understand how Asbury came to be such a caring and vibrant community.  While the importance of a focused and transformational leader cannot be overstated, I kept hearing about the connections between congregants and neighborhood, congregants and congregants, as well as congregants and their own souls.

This spiritual community thrives because of its foundational values.  I heard about:

  • Acceptance and Authenticity.
    • When you walk in the door, you do not have to pretend to be what you are not. You do not have to hide who you are. Billy explained the concept of koininia: fellowship, participation, sharing, and contribution.  One parishioner, according to Preston, said she found “A loving, open and accepting Church that includes all of us — as Jesus would — with love, without judgment.…You’re always welcome!”    Or, simply, community.
  • Listening and Reflection.
    • The words “I don’t know” play an important part at Asbury. The congregants remain free to explore (are encouraged to explore) their own paths.  Rather than a church that remains stagnant, dogmatic, and unquestioning, the members find encouragement to question and admit when they do not know something. And then search for the answers. To communicate we must first listen—truly listen—to one another. Then we connect and appreciate. Community.
  • Vulnerability and Growth.
    • When we let go of the need to be “right” at all costs and the obsession to cling to unaccepting dogma, we open up to vulnerability—and growth opportunities. There will be times when people disappoint us. And when that happens, the congregation has made the commitment to hang in there “until grace happens.” But, someone may draw within and withdraw from the church. If someone “goes missing,” church members notice and reach out to make sure all is OK. They refer to “Calling the Missing.” Caring, open, accepting and authentic (see above). Not intrusive. Community.

Video recommendation for the week.

Listen to Reverend Billy Hester’s sermon from May 6, 2018.  Using humor, stories, and conviction, he connects the power of vulnerability to our ability to grow.


  • Relevance and Resilience.
    • Billy’s sermons have to pass a two-part litmus test. (1) Does the message connect with people by helping them identify with the message? (2) What is the positive impact on the listeners’ lives? Again, it’s not about showing how much the preacher knows about content. Rather, how does the content help people accept, live, and grow together?  Community.

Our conversation had many takeaways*. On one level, don’t leave with the idea this is a loosey-goosey operation.  These good people are intensely intentional about community. Very. They appreciate that from our diversity we grow. One author states, “Community is an engine for peace, it is fuel for justice.” That is what I feel at Asbury.

I will leave you with a powerful observation a congregant shared with Preston and Billy. The Asbury community, she said, has become a “safe place to land” for her and so many others. Acceptance. Authenticity. Listening. Reflection. Vulnerability. Growth. Relevance. Resilience.

Community.

(*And I will share more about the Asbury story in my forthcoming book about developing and sustaining community.)

 Make it an inspiring week and H.T.R.B. as needed.

For information about and to order my book, Stories about Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island, click here.  A number of colleges and one state-wide agency have adopted it for training and coaching purposes. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same.

The paperback price on Amazon is now $14.99 and the Kindle version stands at $5.99.

My podcasts: The Growth and Resilience Network® (http://stevepiscitelli.com/media-broadcast/podcast).

My programs and webinars: website  (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/what-i-do) and (http://stevepiscitelli.com/programs/webinars).

Pearson Education publishes my student textbooks for life success—Choices for College Success (3rd edition) and Study Skills: Do I Really Need This Stuff? (3rd edition).

(c) 2018. Steve Piscitelli. All rights reserved.

Posted in acceptance, assumptions, authenticity, Being REMARKABLE, Choice, Civility, collaboration, Communication, core values, vulnerability, wisdom | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment