(Issue #545) Predictability. Adventure. Risks.

What might be driving us forward, holding us in neutral,
or pushing us in reverse?

Ever feel like you need a news fast? Or just a different—and perhaps a more optimistic—view of life? Not a false view of the world but more like a refreshing perspective.  A way to hit the reset button.

I needed such a reprieve a few days ago (really, it was the latest reprieve of many over the last few months).  I pulled down a book I first read sitting on the beach when it was released in 1998—by Jimmy Buffett: A Pirate Looks at Fifty. The man from Margaritaville sharing stories, lessons, and dreams. Three points (of many that caught my attention) had nothing to do with politics or social media posts (the book was released about 6 years before the emergence of Facebook) or the call-out culture.

These particular thoughts pointed to what might be driving us forward, holding us in neutral, or pushing us in reverse.

  • “Having made it this far [Jimmy was turning 50 years old as he wrote the book], I can’t escape the gnawing fact that, most likely, I have been here more than I will from this point on.” (p. 35)
    • For me, sitting here at 67 years old, I’m most definitely on the back nine of the golf course. What have I learned from where I’ve been that will inform me at to where I might go? How about you? None of us knows how much time we have left. Whatever that number of days, months or years is, how do we want to live it? What’s the difference we want to make?

  • “I take it as a reminder that when you go off adventuring, part of the adventure is the unpredictable.” (p. 100)
    • This one speaks to me more than I would like to admit. Too many times in life I’ve scripted what I will do at a certain time in a certain space. That helped with goals. But I wonder, how much did I miss by not straying from the path of “certitude” and grabbing the unpredictable? That was one reason why I worked my way through two levels of improv comedy training. I wanted to force myself to be unscripted. Maybe you’re like Buffett or trend toward the predictable. See the first point above about the next part of your journey.
  • “Life does not come without risks. You learn to take them, or you stay home and watch life on TV.” (p. 115)
    • Holding on to predictability and being risk-averse have their places. And then there is what adventure can bring us. Our adventure, not someone’s in a movie. See the above point.

Photo by Steve Piscitelli

Again, what might be driving us forward, holding us in neutral, or pushing us in reverse?


Video recommendation for the week:

Finding our way to our way. Jimmy sings about how we might be the people our parents warned us about. 


Make it a great week and HTRB has needed.

My new book has been released.
eBook ($2.99) Paperback ($9.99). Click here.

Roxie Looks for Purpose Beyond the Biscuit.

Well, actually, my dog Roxie gets top billing on the author page for this work. Without her, there would be no story.
Click here for more information about the book.

In the meantime, check out her blog.

And you can still order:

  • My book, Community as a Safe Place to Land (2019), (print and e-book) is available on More information (including seven free podcast episodes that spotlight the seven core values highlighted in the book) at www.stevepiscitelli.com.
  • Check out my book Stories about Teaching, Learning, and Resilience: No Need to be an Island (2017). It has been adopted for teaching, learning, and coaching purposes. I conducted (September 2019) a half-day workshop for a community college’s new faculty onboarding program using the scenarios in this book. Contact me if you and your team are interested in doing the same. The accompanying videos would serve to stimulate community-building conversations at the beginning of a meeting.

My podcasts can be found at The Growth and Resilience Network®.

You will find more about what I do at www.stevepiscitelli.com.

©2020. Steve Piscitelli
The Growth and Resilience Network®

About stevepiscitelli

Facilitator-Author-Teacher
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