(#119) You Might Have to Slow Down in Order to Go Faster

At times we have to turn off the thinking and let the ideas come and go; let them mix with the experiences.

This week I received an email message that I have heard often.  The sender had registered for one of my webinars and shared that she has been doing a lot of soul searching about a career direction; about life direction.  A lot of thinking.  She wrote:

Unfortunately all the “thinking” consumes me… I guess I can summarize by saying
busy, busy but accomplishing very little except to survive. I usually function at a
happy level… but something is missing. I know I can do more and want to. But
how to parlay talents into money…I am looking for that perfect idea,
that perfect  
fit for me.

I understand.  At times I find myself in the same conundrum. This past week I spoke with my students about the trap of doing a lot of “stuff” but not doing the right stuff.  Perhaps you have experienced this yourself. It’s the end of the day; you haven’t stopped all day; you’re exhausted.  But have you moved toward your goals? Or did you just do a lot of stuff?


Video recommendation for the week:

This video provides a reminder to me.  At the end of the day, when I cross out the day (never to have it again) did I move closer to my dreams?  Even when my dreams are a bit nebulous, what steps did I take to clarify them? 


Image: renjith krishnan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Back to the email above.  You’ll note the sender is looking for the “perfect idea.”  Than can be another trap. I have no idea what “perfect” is.   For me, that (searching for the “perfect” idea) would slow me down and become a reason not to do something.  If I were to concentrate on “this has to be perfect” I would end up doing nothing but a lot of thinking, fretting, and stalling.  I avoid the “perfect” syndrome.

Consider this example.  I wrote my first book about 15 years ago. It definitely was NOT perfect. It was, however, the start that I needed.  It got published.  That led to another book…better but still not a blockbuster.  Then another.  Now I am working on my 10th.  Perfect yet? Not by a stretch. Not sure any of my books will ever be “perfect.”  I believe that they are “right” for the time I write them.  But if I had stopped and waited until I got it perfect, I would have missed out on a lot of opportunities and growth. 

Make no mistake. Just because a work is not “perfect” does not mean we have to “settle” for second rate stuff.  I don’t care for the phrase, “Oh, that is good enough.”  Generally, when I hear that, whatever is in question is NOT good enough.  I have an obligation to do the very best I can with every project I commit to doing. Integrity requires that. 

Image: Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Years ago a friend who is a professor and practicing psychologist offered this advice:

At times we have to turn off the thinking and let the ideas come and go;
let them mix with our experiences.  For a week or two, just turn off the analysis.  Calm the mind.

As 1960s as it might sound, at times we have to go with the flow. We might just have to   slow down in order to go faster.  

Enjoy your week—and H.T.R.B.as needed!

REGISTER NOW for my September, 6 2012 P.D.Q. Webinar “Develop and Deliver POW-WOW-ERFUL Presentations!”  Click here  or paste this link into your web browser: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6414521493740300288

Thank you for taking the time to read my blog post. Please pass it (and any of the archived posts on this site) along to friends and colleagues. You can also follow me on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. If you get a chance, visit my Facebook page and join in–or start–a conversation (www.facebook.com/stevepiscitelli). Also, if you have suggestions for future posts, leave a comment. Have a wonderful week!

 

8 Responses to (#119) You Might Have to Slow Down in Order to Go Faster

  1. Alicia C. says:

    Hello, I would like to say that i think i understand wht your saying that sometimes if your doing all you can in a day but it isn’t going to help you, you have missed the point of doing what matters.

    Like

  2. Jasmine says:

    This particular post caught my eye, when i saw the video we viewed in class. That video reminded me of myself in so many ways. I am one to put things off for so long,it causes me to become the stress,and that stress causes me to be bitter toward others. That phrase “At times we have to turn off the thinking and let the ideas come and go; let them mix with the experiences.” For now on im goin to apply this quote to my everyday life. I think if i relax and turn off my thinking than things in my life will flow more nauturally and less stressful

    Like

  3. Kali says:

    I can definitely relate to this scenario. When we watched this video in class I couldn’t help but think, “THAT’S ME”. I have so many hopes and dreams but I feel that my extreme procrastination will bring me down. Lately I’ve been trying to make more of a schedule or plan out what days I’ll do which work and it’s going well so far.
    This video ultimately taught me that there’s so much time in the day but where’s it all going???

    Like

  4. Cortney says:

    I can really relate to this because I often fine myself putting things off to do other things that in my mind are important. But in the end I realize that what I thought was important is not getting me to where I need or want to be. Wathcing the video I can relate with it, I have a verty big problem with procrastination and making excuses for why I havent accomplished something in the time given to me. This is one of the biggest problems that I am facing. I try to apply the things that I learn in class to my everyday life.

    Like

  5. Akia says:

    This blog was interesting because I often do that sometimes. I do everything besides what i am suppose to do. You have to focus on your main priority.

    Like

  6. […]        Simply stated, you have set your sites much too high—at least for where you are right now.  The student who says “I will raise my English grade from an ‘F’ to an ‘A’ in one week” is delusional. So is the person who has never had a regular workout regimen and now vows to work out 2 hours per day for 5 days every week. Please don’t misread this.  Setting big goals—goals that force us to stretch separate the good from the great (as Jim Collins has said). This might be the place to break those huge goals into smaller and more manageable short-term goals. Start small…and stay steady! […]

    Like

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